Helpful Resources

A New Website for Teens: WashingTeenHelp.org

Being a teen parent comes with some unique challenges, WithinReach is pleased to introduce you to their new website WashingTeenHelp.org! The site is designed to support a healthy family. Just like ParentHelp123.org website, users can:

*Search for community resources across the state.
*Apply for health and food benefit programs.
*Read about health information important for teens and young families.

Check out WashingTeenHelp.org

Best Practices in Homeless Education: School Selection for Students in Out-of-Home Care

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The Legal Center for Foster Care and Education and the National Center for Homeless Education present this brief to provide a framework for local homeless education liaisons, educators, child welfare caseworkers, and other child welfare advocates for assessing best interest when selecting a school for students in out-of-home care.

Child Safety: A Guide for Judges and Attorneys Care

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This Guide offers a comprehensive approach to child safety decision-making, addressing the fundamentals of safety assessments and safety planning. It is targeted towards judges and others in the legal community, but is relevant for agency staff too. When agency staff expects judges to ask probing, detailed questions, workers and attorneys will come to court prepared, and will make more thoughtful case decisions.

Differential Response in Child Protective Services: A Literature Review

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This literature review presents a brief history and description of the practices that define
differential response, as well as findings from several evaluation studies. Peer-reviewed articles, project reports, and conference presentations have also been reviewed, but policy manuals and other differential response-related jurisdictional documents have not been included.

Evolving Models of Practice and Differential Response Systems

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This issue brief focuses on the development of practice models specific to child welfare practice in jurisdictions within the United States where differential response systems are being developed and implemented. Differential response refers to the way a public child welfare system can be organized to respond in more than one way to screened-in reports of child maltreatment, based on such factors as the type and severity of the alleged maltreatment, number and sources of previous reports, and the willingness of the family to participate in child protective services.

This brief will summarize the various models and draft model components rather than advocate for or evaluate any one particular model.

Differential Response in Child Protective Services: A Guide for Judges and Judicial Officers

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Differential Response refers to a system reform that allows a CPS agency to respond in more than one way to screened-in reports of child maltreatment.

In 2008, the U.S. Children’s Bureau awarded a grant to American Humane Association and its partners, Walter R. McDonald & Associates Inc. and the Institute of Applied Research, to operate the National Quality Improvement Center on Differential Response in Child Protective Services (QIC-DR). The QIC-DR focuses on advancements related to differential response, a CPS system reform that is being implemented in a growing number of States and countries
and is described in more detail in this brief.

Education and CASA Volunteers: Advocating for “ample provision for the education” of children in dependency in Washington State by Washington State CASA

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All children in Washington State, regardless of ability or disability, have legal rights to an education that will prepare them to participate in and contribute to society. This guidebook begins with a look at the unique educational needs of children from birth through age eighteen who are dependent on the state. The focus then shifts to actions that Court Appointed Special Advocate (CASA) programs and volunteers can take to make sure the educational needs of individual children are met.

This guidebook is specifically designed for CASA program staff to use in making sure all children referred to their program are getting “ample provision for education” as guaranteed in the Washington State Constitution.

The Stuart Foundation provided grants to the Washington State Association of CASA/GAL Programs for the Education Advocacy Project. Washington State CASA administered the project and produced this manual with the assistance of the local CASA/GAL programs in Benton/Franklin, Chelan/Douglas, Cowlitz, Island, Okanogan, Snohomish, and Walla Walla counties.

Four Keys for CASA: Unlocking doors to permanent homes for abused and neglected children by Washington State CASA

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After 4 years and countless experiences of volunteers and children, best practices from the Achieving Permanence Project sites are collected and organized for publication. The Four Keys for CASA include 1) Collaboration and Community Commitment; 2) Training Volunteer Advocates for Legally Free Children; 3) Supervising and Nurturing the Process; 4) Resources and tools to use along the way. The Four Keys manual is designed for use by program managers and volunteer coordinators to help in preparation, training and supervision of volunteers working with children who are legally free for adoption. Forms and checklists that programs have found useful as children move through the system toward permanence are included in the resource section.

The Stuart Foundation provided grants to the Washington State Association of CASA/GAL Programs for the Achieving Permanence Project. Washington State CASA administered the project and produced this manual with the assistance of the local CASA/GAL programs in Benton/Franklin, Chelan/Douglas, Cowlitz, Island, Okanogan, Pierce, Snohomish, Walla Walla, and Yakima counties.

National CASA/GAL Volunteer Training Curriculum & Volunteer Manual by National CASA.

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The Volunteer Manual is organized into ten chapters and is the companion piece for CASA core trainings. Designed specifically for the adult learner and those new to the idea of CASA, it can still be condsidered an excellent resource for experienced volunteers. Chapters include “Understanding Families”, “Exploring Cultural Awareness”, “Understanding Children”, “Introducing the Law and Child Protection System.”